'English Bull Terrier' Handpulled Drypoint Print, Edition of only 12

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'English Bull Terrier' Handpulled Drypoint Print, Edition of only 12

250.00

Welcome to my Handpulled Drypoint Edition Prints.

I absolutely LOVE working in Drypoint Printmaking.  I have my own printmaking press in my studio and love the mix of line that only this technique can offer.  Please find out more about this process below.

These prints are of English Bull Terrier which are dogs that offer so much character to draw and include.  I work in waterbased oil ink onto thick watercolour paper.    As you can see, each print is different which means that each is an original piece of work in it's on right.  

These prints are 30 x 30cm on a larger sheet of paper with deckled edges (this means ripped by hand - a traditional printmaking technique).  Each print is numbered according to the order of which it was printed.  A/P means 'Artist Proof'.  These are the first prints to be pulled and the ones that artists work from before heading into the actual number edition 1/12,  2/12,  3/12, etc.

Each print is hand titled, numbered and signed by me.  

More photographs of these prints will be coming shortly.

P&P is free within the UK.  For postage overseas please email info@samanthabarnes.co.uk

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What is Drypoint Printmaking?

This technique of ‘Drypoint Printmaking’ was first used in the 15th Century and one used during the pivotal Art Movements of the 20th Century.

Drypoint Printmaking is part of the 'Intaglio' family of printmaking.  

The technique is to draw directly onto a piece of zinc using scratch pens.  This creates a ‘burr’ or groove in the metal plate.  Ink is then applied onto the plate and into the burrs until the Artist is happy (this part is a little like painting directly onto the plate).  Before the ink dries, the metal place is laid face up on the press, ready to have prepared, dampened papers laid on top of it.  More tissue sheets are added and the press blankets are placed on top and then it goes under the roller, in my case twice.

Unpeeling the print from the metal plate is the most exciting thing ever.  Once happy with the print (there are generally 3 made for each print that leaves my studio) it is placed under heavy boards for a good 3 days to flatten the paper.

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