7 Ways To Support An Artist Whose Work You Love, But Is Struggling

Have you found an artist or maker whose work you love?  Are you on your second/third purchase of their work and think they could do with a leg-up somehow?  You can help.  Below are some ways that you can help your artist.

'7 Ways To Help An Artist' Blog Post by Samantha Barnes

1.     Retweet Tweets, Share on Facebook, Heart on Instagram & Save on Pinterest.  All help to feed the Google spider and could well lead to your artist being noticed, sending new people to their website.

2.     Have a conversation with them.  Ask them how it’s going – what they are struggling with.  It’s great when clients ask us artists how we are and what’s going on with business – a conversation can make all the difference.

3.     Volunteer!  Do they need any help?  Perhaps you able to offer out some of your time and see what they say.  Prints need wrapping, whatever task you undertake – you will be helping.

4.     Do you have a lovely house?  It may be small but perhaps central.  Could you offer your artist a small weekend show in it?    These pop-ups make for lovely shows and are called ‘Rogues Gallery’.    The important bit about these is your opening evening – invite ALL your mates and I bet they will buy too.  (More about this option in my next blog post)

5.     Could you learn from your artist?  If you gathered up say 6 of your friends, you could club together and ask him/her if they would be interested in running an impromptu workshop for you all?  A concentrated 4 – 6 workshop either in their studio, at your home or in a village hall.  A good rate for an artist’s workshop is about £250 so gather in as many as you need to reach that price.

6.     Offer some precious cash!  If you really love their work, perhaps you could offer them £50 to have some flyers made to list their next events?  (Instant Print is good)

 

7.     Think through your contact list.  Do you know of any great stylists, photographers or others that might be good for your artist to talk to?  Think it over, chat to your contact and ask if they would mind giving 10 minutes of their time – contacts are an essential part of your artists climb.  Once your contact has agreed, chat to your artist and try to help them identify good things to ask them or to base a conversation around in order to make best use of the time.

I hope the above points help, they certainly have helped me over the years.

I’d love to hear how you get on, Best wishes, Sam. 

Thanks to jose aljovin for the photograph.